"American Indian the FORGOTTEN MINORITY "



Wednesday, December 24, 2014

"Merry Christmas" everyone, and may GOD BLESS each of you!
Happy Hanukkah for my Jewish friends and GOD BLESS Israel...!!!!!!  
Legends of Christmas

Christmas Wreaths
The wreaths of Christmas are very special symbols of the season. Wreaths represent a love that knows no end. Much like the wedding bands that couples exchange when married, the wreath has no beginning and no ending. So, too, the love which came down at Christmas is eternal love, and the wreaths symbolize the love of God that never ends.

The Christmas Tree Star
Christmas Star on top of the tree for the most part represents the Star of Bethlehem. Christians see candles as "Christ's Light" and the lighting of candles on Christmas Eve comes from the Jewish "Feast of Lights" or Hanukkah.

The Candy Cane
The candy cane represents one of the oldest symbols of Christmas, the shepherd's crook, for the shepherds were among the first to experience that first Christmas. The colors of the candy cane have special meaning, too. The wide red stripe represents the sacrifice of Christ, "For by his stripes we are healed." The narrow red stripes represent our own sacrifices (giving). The white stripe is a symbol of purity. The peppermint plant is a member of the hyssop family, referred to in the Old Testament as a medicinal herb used for cleansing. As you eat your candy cane, you might want to break it, as Christ's body was broken for you, and share it with a friend, thus sharing in the sweetness of the true meaning of Christmas. 

Christmas tree
The Christmas tree, which is an evergreen with it's boughs stretched toward heaven, reminds us of the everlasting life that Christ came to bring sinners. The candles or lights on the tree remind us that Jesus is the light of the world.

The Holly
The holly leaves and berries from the holly bush are widely used in holiday decorations. The sharp pointy edges of the holly leaf remind us of the crown of thorns that Jesus wore upon his brow. The red berries remind us of the blood that Jesus shed. 

Twelve Days of Christmas 
There is one Christmas Carol that has always baffled me. What in the world do leaping lords, French hens, swimming swans, and especially the partridge who won't come out of the pear tree have to do with Christmas? From 1558 until 1829, Roman Catholics in England were not permitted to practice their faith openly. Someone during that era wrote this carol as a catechism song for young Catholics. It has two levels of meaning: the surface meaning plus a hidden meaning known only to members of their church. Each element in the carol has a code word for a religious reality which the children could remember.

-The partridge in a pear tree was Jesus Christ.
-Two turtle doves were the Old and New Testaments. 
-Three French hens stood for faith, hope and love.- 
-The four calling birds were the four gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke & John.
-The five golden rings recalled the Torah or Law, the first five books of the Old Testament. 
-The six geese a-laying stood for the six days of creation.
-Seven swans a-swimming represented the sevenfold gifts of the Holy Spirit--Prophesy, Serving,  Teaching, Exhortation, Contribution, Leadership, and Mercy. 
-The eight maids a-milking were the eight beatitudes. 
-Nine ladies dancing were the nine fruits of the Holy Spirit--Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness,  Goodness, Faithfulness, Gentleness, and Self Control. 
-The ten lords a-leaping were the ten commandments. 
-The eleven pipers piping stood for the eleven faithful disciples. 
-The twelve drummers drumming 

Just a little trivia for Christmas to see how many knew about some of the legends of/for Christmas.